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Current Artists

Jennifer Nevitt Jennifer Nevitt received a BFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1996 and an MFA from the University of Minnesota in 2011.  She is influenced by the idea that real life expands our concept of art, using painting, sculpture, and textiles to explore narratives pertaining to the human experience of dwelling and being.   These pieces represent a part of my practice I think of as primers.  Primers serve as an introduction to a subject of study and are used for teaching.  I weave the exploration of color, brush action, paper and different water based medias to create a visual diary.  By storing memory, time and touch in this type of weaving the paintings bring attention to textiles I used daily in my home, primarily the ones in my kitchen; hand towels, table cloths and curtains.  Daily practices give me familiar coordinates.  I use them as both a launch pad and a homing beacon.

Jennifer Nevitt

Jennifer Nevitt received a BFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1996 and an MFA from the University of Minnesota in 2011.  She is influenced by the idea that real life expands our concept of art, using painting, sculpture, and textiles to explore narratives pertaining to the human experience of dwelling and being.

 

These pieces represent a part of my practice I think of as primers.  Primers serve as an introduction to a subject of study and are used for teaching.  I weave the exploration of color, brush action, paper and different water based medias to create a visual diary.  By storing memory, time and touch in this type of weaving the paintings bring attention to textiles I used daily in my home, primarily the ones in my kitchen; hand towels, table cloths and curtains.  Daily practices give me familiar coordinates.  I use them as both a launch pad and a homing beacon.

Jeff Millikan Jeff Millikan was born In Rochester, Minnesota in 1952. His work has been exhibited and collected extensively and he has had numerous solo exhibitions including the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Walker Art Center, the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, and the Lawrence Miller Gallery, NYC. He has received numerous awards in the Arts including Fellowships from the Jerome Foundation, the MN State Arts Board, the McKnight Foundation and the Bush Foundation, and residencies from as diverse of organizations as the Polaroid Corporation to the Bell Museum of Natural History. The themes in my work have always revolved around the darker aspects of the human condition and our futile attempts to control and subvert the natural forces around us. For the Bee Book series I’ve been collaborating with nature in a more radical way, using insects themselves to create the sculptural pieces. I’ve constructed a series of specialized bee hives which I stock with various texts. By cutting and painting the books with beeswax I’m able to suggest shapes on which the bees build comb. Though it’s a slow and rather tedious process and they rarely do what I’ve intended, I’m able to cut, melt and alter the pieces throughout the process, with the bees in each instance repairing or responding to what I’ve done with alterations of their own. At times there are thousands of bees on one book and in some instances, they are full of nectar and brood casings and literally dripping with honey. It fascinates me to watch the reclamation of such a potent symbol of civilization by nature’s agents. The books were recorded with an 8" x 10" view camera and digitally scanned.

Jeff Millikan

Jeff Millikan was born In Rochester, Minnesota in 1952. His work has been exhibited and collected extensively and he has had numerous solo exhibitions including the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Walker Art Center, the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, and the Lawrence Miller Gallery, NYC. He has received numerous awards in the Arts including Fellowships from the Jerome Foundation, the MN State Arts Board, the McKnight Foundation and the Bush Foundation, and residencies from as diverse of organizations as the Polaroid Corporation to the Bell Museum of Natural History.

The themes in my work have always revolved around the darker aspects of the human condition and our futile attempts to control and subvert the natural forces around us. For the Bee Book series I’ve been collaborating with nature in a more radical way, using insects themselves to create the sculptural pieces. I’ve constructed a series of specialized bee hives which I stock with various texts. By cutting and painting the books with beeswax I’m able to suggest shapes on which the bees build comb. Though it’s a slow and rather tedious process and they rarely do what I’ve intended, I’m able to cut, melt and alter the pieces throughout the process, with the bees in each instance repairing or responding to what I’ve done with alterations of their own. At times there are thousands of bees on one book and in some instances, they are full of nectar and brood casings and literally dripping with honey. It fascinates me to watch the reclamation of such a potent symbol of civilization by nature’s agents. The books were recorded with an 8" x 10" view camera and digitally scanned.

 
Will Bentsen Will Bentsen, born in Houston, Texas in 1965 is a contemporary American artist living and working in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Bentsen’s work fluctuates between painting and sculpture. He finds inspiration in the periphery of everyday life such as a discarded pile of papers or a tennis ball in a swimming pool. Using both traditional and nontraditional materials his work is often playful and irreverent with an experimental quality.  Will Bentsen has exhibited nationally and his work is held in many private collections. He was co-founder of the legendary Houston anti-art collective “I Love You Baby” with Paul Kremer and Rodney Elliott (1997-2007).  In 2007 Bentsen moved to Saint Paul where he began the process of working with color, form, texture, and weight.  This particular grouping consists of aesthetic material investigations and color thought experiments from 2010 to present.

Will Bentsen

Will Bentsen, born in Houston, Texas in 1965 is a contemporary American artist living and working in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Bentsen’s work fluctuates between painting and sculpture. He finds inspiration in the periphery of everyday life such as a discarded pile of papers or a tennis ball in a swimming pool. Using both traditional and nontraditional materials his work is often playful and irreverent with an experimental quality.

 Will Bentsen has exhibited nationally and his work is held in many private collections. He was co-founder of the legendary Houston anti-art collective “I Love You Baby” with Paul Kremer and Rodney Elliott (1997-2007).  In 2007 Bentsen moved to Saint Paul where he began the process of working with color, form, texture, and weight.

 This particular grouping consists of aesthetic material investigations and color thought experiments from 2010 to present.

Patricia Canelake Patricia Canelake lives and works in Knife River, Minnesota, a small fishing village on the north shore of Lake Superior.  She grew up on the Iron Range in Virginia, Minnesota where her father ran a handmade candy shop. She presently dips chocolates in Knife River and works at painting and printmaking in her two small, renovated buildings which face the scenic North Shore highway and Lake Superior. Her rural studio informs her practice immensely and her work often spills out into a large yard where she can stretch canvases outdoors or bring canvases to dry in the northeast winds. Canelake has received two McKnight awards, three Minnesota State Arts Board Grants, Public Art Commissions, and Arrowhead Regional Arts awards. She has participated in over eight national and international artist residencies, including Yaddo and MacDowell Colonies. She taught Media Arts at Highland Park Senior High School in St. Paul, Minnesota as well as visual art and art history courses at Lake Superior College, Fond du Lac Community College, and Itasca Community College. For Canelake, her aesthetic is an aesthetic of attraction — both obvious and mysterious. Simple figurative and animal subjects, leashed and unleashed, are the subjects of her work. She believes that push and pull are recognizable experiences. Her painting style is a fine balance between storytelling and the rough elegance of form, line and color.

Patricia Canelake

Patricia Canelake lives and works in Knife River, Minnesota, a small fishing village on the north shore of Lake Superior.  She grew up on the Iron Range in Virginia, Minnesota where her father ran a handmade candy shop. She presently dips chocolates in Knife River and works at painting and printmaking in her two small, renovated buildings which face the scenic North Shore highway and Lake Superior. Her rural studio informs her practice immensely and her work often spills out into a large yard where she can stretch canvases outdoors or bring canvases to dry in the northeast winds.

Canelake has received two McKnight awards, three Minnesota State Arts Board Grants, Public Art Commissions, and Arrowhead Regional Arts awards. She has participated in over eight national and international artist residencies, including Yaddo and MacDowell Colonies. She taught Media Arts at Highland Park Senior High School in St. Paul, Minnesota as well as visual art and art history courses at Lake Superior College, Fond du Lac Community College, and Itasca Community College.

For Canelake, her aesthetic is an aesthetic of attraction — both obvious and mysterious. Simple figurative and animal subjects, leashed and unleashed, are the subjects of her work. She believes that push and pull are recognizable experiences. Her painting style is a fine balance between storytelling and the rough elegance of form, line and color.